Problemas de eliminación

Guíese por este cuadro para obtener más información acerca del dolor, comezón (picor) o sangre que se presentan con una evacuación intestinal (al defecar o hacer popó).

Nuestro confiado verificador de síntomas fue creado y revisado por médicos y profesionales de educaccion de pacientes. Escoje un síntoma y responde ha las preguntas para encontrar una diagnóstico posible.

Hable con su médico de familia para averiguar si esta información se aplica a usted y para obtener más información sobre este tema.

Paso 2

Respondiendo preguntas

  • Is the affected person an infant or child?

  • Do you have pain or discomfort with your bowel movements?

  • Do you have to strain when you have a bowel movement, and are your stools hard and dry?

  • Do you have a fever, chills and intense pain near the anus even when you’re not having a bowel movement?

  • Is there itching when you have a bowel movement?

  • Do you have a small reddish mass of tissue sticking out of your anus?

  • Is there occasional bright red blood in your stools, and do you have a small, tender lump near the rectum?

  • Do you have itching around your rectum even when you’re not having a bowel movement?

  • Do you have blood on or mixed in your bowel movements?

  • Are your bowel movements gray or whitish?

  • Do you have problems moving your bowels without a laxative or enema?

Paso 3

Posibles Causas

  • Diagnosis

    CONSTIPATION can cause these symptoms.


    Self Care

    Add more FIBER to your diet, and drink lots of fluids. Bulk-forming laxatives may also help relieve constipation. Check to see if any medicine you are taking could be causing constipation.


  • Diagnosis

    You may have a PERIRECTAL ABSCESS, an infected area near the anus.


    Self Care

    See your doctor.


  • Diagnosis

    You may have a RECTAL PROLAPSE. People who have this condition may feel like they can’t completely empty their bowels. They may also pass very small stools or be unable to control their bowel movements.


    Self Care

    See your doctor.


  • Diagnosis

    You may have an external or thrombosed HEMORRHOID.


    Self Care

    Using over-the-counter hemorrhoidal creams or suppositories and soaking the area in warm water may help relieve the pain and itching. If there’s no improvement in 1 to 2 weeks, or if the bleeding continues, see your doctor.


  • Diagnosis

    Rectal itching may be a sign of a YEAST INFECTION, ALLERGY to toilet paper or PINWORMS.


    Self Care

    Nonprescription antifungal medications for yeast infections or antiparasitic medications for pinworms are available. If you think an allergy is your problem, try using white, unscented toilet paper. See your doctor if your symptoms don’t improve.


  • Diagnosis

    The blood may be from internal HEMORRHOIDS. Internal hemorrhoids usually don’t cause any discomfort. But RECTAL CANCER is another possibility, especially if you’re over age 40. Other signs of rectal cancer may include changes in the shape of your stools and a cramping pain in your lower stomach.


    Self Care

    See your doctor. Hemorrhoids are often treated with over-the-counter creams or suppositories. Soaking in warm water may also help relieve any discomfort.


  • Diagnosis

    You may have a BLOCKAGE in or near your gallbladder, or you may have a LIVER DISEASE or INFECTION.


    Self Care

    SEE YOUR DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY.


  • Diagnosis

    Overuse of laxatives can cause dependence on them.


    Self Care

    Avoid using laxatives. Instead, try adding more FIBER to your diet, and drink lots of fluids. Keep in mind that it isn’t necessary to have a bowel movement every day. A normal range is 3 times a day to 3 times a week.


  • Diagnosis


    Self Care

    Avoid using laxatives. Instead, try adding more FIBER to your diet, and drink lots of fluids. Keep in mind that it isn’t necessary to have a bowel movement every day. A normal range is 3 times a day to 3 times a week.